Thought Catalog


14 Sex Workers Reveal The Most Fucked Up Thing A Client Ever Asked For In Bed

Posted: 15 Sep 2016 08:00 PM PDT

Flickr / Manuela Montanarelli
Flickr / Manuela Montanarelli

Answers originally posted to R/AskReddit

1.

“He wanted me to do his taxes with no pants on. 300/ hour.”

— Bucket_O_Beef

2.

“A buddy of mine in college was one of the university’s starting baseball pitchers. He also happened to be gay. (Nobody cared about the gay thing. He was a nice guy. Whatever.) After college, he got an entry-level management job in the Miami area. The pay was crap, of course, so he started moonlighting as a RentBoy to augment his income. Eventually, he got hired by some wealthy closet case. Showed up at the client’s home where he was led into the garage and shown a 50-gallon barrel. Filled with oranges. The client went into the opposite corner of the garage, stripped down naked, and asked my buddy to throw the oranges at him. As Buddy tells it:

‘Man, I’m gay and everything. But I was a college baseball player. I throw in the high 80’s. Are you SURE you want me to do this?’ Client LOVED HIM. Buddy plunked the guy for 20 minutes and got asked back every two weeks for the next 3 years. No sex. Just oranges. C’est la vie.”

— ChillingMarmoset

3.

“One client wanted me to pretend to sleep, while he had his ways with me. Turned out that it only involved him groping me, spreading my ass and whispering ‘Oh my lovely little baby girl’ while jerking off for half an hour. Just charged him my normal 30 min fee — Easy money, really!”

— spergmom

4.

“My ex-girlfriend used to do amateur web-camming. One night she had a rather odd request. This guy asked that she put her dildo in her ass, take it out, and then gag herself with it until she puked. She did, and I honestly couldn’t tell you how much she made off the request. I can, however, tell you that she spent an obscene amount of money on me, leading me to believe the gig (or gag, ~slaps knee) paid well.”

— GnashtyBounce

5.

“One of my regulars progressed from licking my crotch, to me facesitting him, to farting him in the face — and, finally he had me poop on hi face. It disrupted my OCD controlled toilet habits severely, but at the equivalent of around $750 per session it was all worth it.”

— spergmom

6.

“I work at a gentleman’s club as a VIP hostess. Guests would ask me for everything they wanted (blonde girls, fake Boob girls, drugs, sex workers) and the most unusual request I got was a man was looking for an escort to take out for $800 dollars to pretend to be his wife at a company dinner. Apparently, he was single and gay and lied to his co-workers about having a wife to get out of a few events. The lie got out of control I guess…”

— Hisladyalways

7.

“Played the part of ‘suspicious customs officer’ many times with another regular. Somehow it always ended up with an extremely thorough cavity search and simultaneous penis inspection. Never found anything though…”

— spergmom

8.

“I had the chance to ask an escort this very question. She told me she had a regular who liked her to shit on his chest, then take a spoon and feed it to him.”

— chasethenoise

9.

“I had a guy pay me $150 every other week to give me a blowjob while rubbing my sneakers.”

— AsAGayJewishDemocrat

10.

One man wanted to take me to the shopping centre (he became a regular but this was from the first meeting). As in, he wanted to pay me to buy me things. After that, we would go back to his and fuck, but he paid standard rates for the whole time and I kept the stuff he bought me (Sexy underwear, DVDs, books.)

— EscortThrowawayUK

11.

“Was a sex worker, dealt with a lot of fetishes

  • A guy once hired me to pretend he was famous and act like I was a huge fan of his that got lucky.
  • One guy hired me and paid me twice as much to clean his apart whilst wearing nothing thigh-high socks and sneakers.
  • One guy had this big blue suit that blew up into a big ball and made me look like the girl that turned into a blueberry in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. He had me put that on, and then jerked off on me while I acted like I’d been turned into a blueberry.”

— SchrubSchrubSchrub

12.

“An older man who wanted to fuck in the changing rooms — of his shop. He tried to pay me in corsets at first, but we agreed on cash + a discount on merchandise. I’d run into guys who wanted to fuck in public before, but they didn’t usually own the premises.”

— EscortThrowawayUK

13.

“Former stripper here, a bit late to the party but this is a weird story.

I had a guy who would come in at opening every night and book me for an hour just to sniff my armpits. At first, I was like wtf but hey, it was $200 to sit there for an hour and make small talk with the guy. He wanted my top off for easy access but nothing else and no dancing. Sweet.

After a few times he got a bit bolder and asked if I’d stop wearing deodorant (or not put it on until after he left) and if I would jump around/run on the spot a bit to get sweatier, which it started to irk me a little bit but he was harmless. One day he just disappeared without a goodbye :(

I like to think he found a girlfriend whose pits he could sniff for free.”

— abri56

14.

“I had several guys who wanted me to be the stern teacher and them the naughty schoolboy. I was 19, these guys were almost always in their 50s, so it was slightly ridiculous but it apparently worked for them. They paid rates + a half because they usually wanted to keep my stockings and fetish stuff was extra.”

— EscortThrowawayUK TC mark

I Watched My Boyfriend Have Sex With A Stranger And It Hurt Like Hell

Posted: 15 Sep 2016 07:00 PM PDT

Pexels
Pexels

I’ve told myself millions of times to stop. Stop going out of my way to satisfy him. Stop watching Hell’s Kitchen, just because he likes it. Stop cutting my hair short, just because he says I look prettier that way. Stop being “that girl,” because she’s definitely not me.

But how can I stop myself from doing these things if they make him happy? If he’s happy, I’m happy. That might be the shittiest thing you’ll hear today, but it’s true.

Yesterday, I woke up to the reality that what I’m doing is too much. But I still can’t fathom the thought of leaving him. Call me stupid, but that’s just how much I love him. Last week, he asked me if I was willing to watch him have sex with another girl. I answered him with a question. “Will that make you happy?” He said yes. “Yes. It’s fun and it’s one of my fantasies. Just thinking about it makes me giddy.”

So I agreed.

He never told me when it would happen, so my heart stopped beating when I saw a girl’s clothing scattered on his stairs. I could hear both of them panting and the bed creaking as I made my way into the bedroom. Every step I took felt like a step closer to my death. I wanted to run, but I couldn’t. I reminded myself of why I answered yes in the first place. Because it would make him happy and I would do anything to make him happy.

Once I got inside, I couldn’t do anything, except sit in a chair as I watched them ravish each other. The same chair where I’m writing this story.

“So you’re here,” he said to me as he stopped to catch his breath for a moment, not even looking me in the eyes. I didn’t answer. I just stared blankly at the bed. I guess he was too busy to wait for my answer, so he went back to thrusting. I felt the blood rush down from my head as I was filled with questions. How long had she been here? Could she please him better than I could?

I knew I should’ve said no. But I loved him too much to do so. Seeing him touch her made my whole body numb. With every thrust, my bones cracked. I died every time I heard him moaning in pleasure as she rode on top of him.

He fucked her as if he hadn’t been fucked for years. He fucked her as if I wasn’t even there. It almost killed me when I heard him groan as he climaxed. My heart nearly exploded when I saw her bring him to that high.

I stopped myself from crying, because I wanted him to think that it was all fine with me. That I was willing to do anything for him. But I felt like an outsider inside of our own house. Minutes passed by, both of them breathing heavily. I finally heard her leave the room. And then it was just us.

Or was it just me?

I wished I was enough for him, because the thing is, he’s more than enough for me. I was left with so many questions. Would this happen again? Would I allow it to happen again? The sad part was, I already knew the answer.

Yes. It will always be yesTC mark

14 Creepy Messages From Fuckboys On Tinder That’ll Make You Laugh Your Ass Off

Posted: 15 Sep 2016 06:00 PM PDT

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17 Millenials Explain How They Really Feel About The Messed-Up Digital Dating World

Posted: 15 Sep 2016 05:45 PM PDT

Grace Chung
Grace Chung

1. “It's hard to keep your head up when you can assume everyone's talking to a bunch of other people at all times too.”

2. “If you are in a relationship you have already gone further than half the people of this generation because nobody dates anymore.”

3. “I feel like social media outlets have destroyed what it means to have a relationship. In the back of our minds, we always know there can be someone else in a half-sec to replace whoever we’re with if things go bad, or if we just happen to change our mind or whatever.”

4. “We live in a pick-and-choose world, where we like to have everything at our fingertips. I can’t say I’d have it any other way. Why commit to one flavor when you can sample a bunch of different ones whenever you want instead?”

5. “I have met some of my best friends on dating apps—not anyone I’m interested in romantically, but still. Can’t be mad at that.”

6. “Met my bf on tinder, and I used to think swiping right for that kid was the best decision of my life. Then I found out he never actually stopped swiping, even after we met and totally hit if off. Typical.”

7. “The way we interact with others is changing, fast, and that’s terrifying. Like, I can’t really remember the last time I had an in-depth, in-person conversation with a dude I was interested in. How messed up is that?”

8. “The Internet and social media allow you to meet many more people than you would otherwise, people you could never hope to meet in your day-to-day. And having a larger pool means you can find better people, and people who are better for you. I haven’t really met anyone yet but I have hope!”

9. “The way I see it, you can keep trying to rearrange the deck chairs on the Titanic, or you can try to find a boat that isn't destined to sink.”

10. “Before dating apps there was dating by mail and before that speed dating and before that news adverts. We aren't doomed.”

11. “Suggesting that we go about meeting people the same way as people in the 90s doesn't take into account the massive cultural change that has happened in the past 15 years. There’s no going back, whether you like it or not.”

12. “Someone needs to make a dating app that doesn't require you to pay for their best features. Of course, it'll never happen because people are greedy, but it would be nice.”

13. “Dating apps are an alternative. It's possible to meet people in person. It just takes way too much time.”

14. “People are people, technology only changes people in ways that they want to be changed. 100 years ago I bet people were saying 'What the hell are we gonna do about telephone culture?!?!'”

15. “Personally, I'm against Tinder. I just find it to be too subjective and superficial. People look at a pic or two and read a little bio and then decide if they want to date that person. It’s totally surface level. I can’t do that.”

16. “Dating apps and website are losing functionality. OkCupid for example used to be awesome, now it sucks. Tinder does a lot of things right, but a lot wrong too. I’m ready for whatever’s next.”

17. “Well I'm marrying a guy I met on tinder, so I wouldn't say they're entirely bad.” TC mark

6 Signs The Love You Share Is REAL Love

Posted: 15 Sep 2016 05:00 PM PDT

Caleb Morris
Caleb Morris

In my generation, many people say "I love you" without really meaning it. Or they screw around with everyone without feeling real emotions.

So how do you know in this day and age? In songs they describe it as a drug like state where you crave the person. Funnily enough, studies have proved this, researchers at Syracuse University have discovered that falling in love triggers the same euphoria that cocaine does.

But I think it happens differently for each person and you cannot define what love is, between each person.

But here are some signs it may be real love.

1. They make you happy

This may seem obvious but if the person is what you look forward to seeing each day, and your heart skips a beat when you're around them. But also *note* you don't cling to them and always need to be with them, I got news for you my friend, you may be in love.

2. They make you a better person

Someone you love should push you to be better, not sit and settle and watch you not be the best you can be. But also shouldn't be putting you down. It's got to be a balance between loving that person for who they are but also pushing them to be who they can be.

3. You're a priority

Someone who loves you will be there when you need them. It's that simple. If they aren't, you might want to question why you are with them.

4. It's unconditional

There should be a clause with the person you love. You love them that's it, even when you fight and want to pull their hair. The love is still there.

5. They're your best friend

This is the dream having your lover be your best friend too. You play fight, talk about anything and are always there for each other, you guys have a strong relationship.

6. Long-term

If you think little gremlins running around and marriage, then yes you are defiantly in love.

Love is complicated and it's never perfect but when you find the one, it's worth the heartache. TC mark

Maybe Your Privilege Is Why You Think Poor People Should Die

Posted: 15 Sep 2016 04:30 PM PDT

@Leomacphoto
@Leomacphoto

Poor people should die. That's what we're getting at, right? Snapping photos of homeless people on the street and complaining about the fact that we can see them. Smiling as we talk fondly about our town's very own homeless person (who, instead of asking their name, we've all dubbed "Scabby"). On the opposite side of the spectrum, we spew criticisms against people who have jobs but still can't afford to live. From the goodness of our hearts, we condescendingly suggest they should just get another job, get more roommates, or magically find the means to move somewhere else and hope there's a job wherever "somewhere else" is. We hear people crying out for help and we try to silence them by insisting they just want "handouts."

We live in a world that teaches us to strive for the "American Dream": to be the best you can be, to take what you have and spin it into gold, to pull yourself up by your bootstraps and make something of yourself. Simultaneously, and perhaps even reactively, we learn to belittle those who have less than us for seemingly not following the obvious path to financial and emotional stability. "I worked my ass off in college," says the person who lived at home and whose parents paid for their education, "so there's no reason why you can't."

We constantly erase the opportunities gifted to us because it doesn't fit the narrative that best allows us to pat ourselves on the back while we criticize someone struggling. We're taught to talk and act like Donald Trump. "It has not been easy for me. And you know I started off in Brooklyn, my father gave me a small loan of a million dollars…"

And yet, despite our humanity encouraging us to think differently, to be empathetic of the people struggling more than us, we act defensively. We have learned to associate money with survival — and we do need money to survive, but we've taken things a step too far. Rather than just recognizing that money is a required aspect of living in modern society, we see symptoms of poverty and attack them like they're communicable. We see one person struggling and get scared that maybe their struggles will be passed on to us.

Instead of seeing homeless people lining the streets and wondering what world we all live in that would leave human beings to live in tents under freeway overpasses, we criticize those people for their conditions.

"It was your decision to ______."

Recognizing the larger forces at work and staying mindful of them — the cycle of poverty, housing crises, lack of access to affordable mental health services, causes of drug addiction, a minimum wage that can't keep up with inflation — takes concerted effort. You have to want to understand why someone is living on the streets or crying out about low wages and you have to want to be aware that you are only one car accident or one company-wide layoff between where you are and where they are. That takes time, empathy, and devoted interest. In this busy world, we hardly have enough for even one of those things. So instead, a new narrative grows alongside the one about how great we are. And in this narrative, it's all about out of sight, out of mind.

Any time we brush up against poverty is a reminder how close we are to being poor.

Don't show me how close I am to failure, just show me how close I could be to success.

We concoct schemes to do better, to work harder. We drink Soylent because not having to think about or take time to prepare food gives us more time to be productive so we can make money to buy more Soylent. We wear Fitbits so we can look at the number of steps we'd do on any given day and be amazed at how great we are without even trying. Imagine how amazed you'd be if you had a machine monitor how many times you breathe in a day. We buy these things because others can't. We constantly need to be reminded that we're worth a lot and in pursuit of that affirmation we do everything we can to scrub from our minds the knowledge that maybe we're not as great as we think. We don't want to be reminded of the humanity of the poor, how they are working harder than us just to be. We want them to stop existing because the existence of those less fortunate is a reminder of how much we squander on ourselves. We all want to be rich, because in wealth is the ability to forget our mortality.

In our pursuit of wealth, we can't afford empathy.

When we talk about how "those people" just want to sit on their asses and collect welfare checks (despite displaying obvious ignorance to the welfare system), what is the motivation? Is it to separate ourselves, in some way, from people who need welfare? Is it to show that, if put in their situation, we'd somehow manage to find a way out of the prison of poverty? Or does the reasoning run deeper, to our subconscious, where we wish poor people would simply cease to exist? Could it be that the existence of poor people is tangible proof that we could someday be where they are? And who do we help by ostracizing those less fortunate? Insulting the poor hasn't been known to magically erase their debts or treat their illnesses. So why is the inclination always to react by lashing out, to criticize, to do everything we can to distance ourselves from these people whose lives are worse than ours?

When you say "Well, you made the choice to ______," what you're really saying is "I don't want to care that you're in trouble."

When you say "They just want everything handed to them," what you're really saying is you have no gratitude for the things you've been given.

When you say, "I had it rough, so why are you complaining?" what you're really saying is suffering should be done silently, out of sight.

Surely you never vented to a friend or your parents about financial troubles, because you've always spent and saved as wisely as possible. But if that's true, haven't you just proved that you have no expertise on how poor people live or how to get out of homelessness? What you're really doing is trying to push away the ugly parts of humanity by reminding yourself of your success. By insisting that poor people should do x, y, or z, you're simultaneously lifting yourself up with your know-it-all gusto and insisting that those you've just scolded be grateful for the advice you've given by no longer complaining in your general vicinity. You're the chef at a soup kitchen serving out hot bowls of What You Should Do and expecting that to be the end of it. No time for any Please sir may I have some more. You've donated your two cents and if that's not enough to make a poor person stop being poor, tough shit for them.

"They lack worth ethic" and "they're a strain on society" are the two hot phrases being tossed around lately. And it's baffling that the people touting these ideologies don't realize that they're saying poor people should just do the world a favor and die. Because being poor is, apparently, a sign of weakness.

Working overtime every week and still not making enough to get by is a weakness. Going to college because you got a full ride is a weakness. Still having to skip classes despite your full ride because some weeks you just don't have enough to cover the drive from your below-poverty line housing to your school. Learning to drink a cup of water to soothe a hungry stomach as a child. Knowing how to make a meal out of nothing. Habitually picking up every coin on the street because you can exchange them for quarters to do laundry. Constantly pushing yourself to do the best you can in the hopes that it may someday propel you out of the poverty you've spent your whole life in.

These are weaknesses. Not because they make you weak, but because they shouldn't have to be challenges. And if they are your challenges, it's not because the world we live in is designed to keep people down. It's because it's your fault for choosing to subject yourself to challenges that shouldn't exist. If you can't even avoid these simple, stupid problems that no one should have to deal with and I'm not going to do anything to fix, why do you even exist?

This is what you say when you criticize those struggling. They don't need you tearing them down with your desperate cruelty. They don't benefit from your hate. You don't even benefit from your hate. Unless, of course, openly telling the world that you think a majority of its population deserves to die is somehow the key to ending poverty. Then have at it! But as far as I can tell, you're better off just admitting that you hate poor people because they remind you that you're not immune to the forces of poverty. TC mark

My Darling, Talk To Me

Posted: 15 Sep 2016 04:00 PM PDT

Freestocks
Freestocks

I want to talk to you.
At 1am, 2am, or even at 3am,

If you are up and worried about something, if you are having a sleepless night, if you are nervous about something or if you are scared to fall asleep after watching a horror movie.

I want to talk to you, even if we have nothing to talk about.
I want to talk to you, about everything under the sun.
I want to talk to you, about the things we don't talk about face to face.

Things we usually don't mention at 8 in the morning, or at every breakfast, lunch or dinner that we will have together.

Talk to me, past midnight where our souls are vulnerable and our thoughts are slowly dying to shut our minds off.

Talk to me, past midnight if you are tired and overthinking, because that is what our minds does to us when the dark fills the night and the moon shines dimly over the dull sky.

Talk to me, because I am ready to listen to every rant, every worry, every curiosity, every doubt, every concern you have in that mind of yours.

We can talk about anything and everything. I don't mind. We can talk about your dogs, what you ate this afternoon, what you found funny in math class today, or even something that happened a month back and it just made you laugh.

At any time, any day. I am ready to listen to you because I care. I care about you, and the silly little things that you want to share to me.

All you have to do is talk to me. TC mark

’27 Feels Kinda Old’ And Other Reasons Why Growing Up Sucks

Posted: 15 Sep 2016 03:45 PM PDT

Hi Internet, I’m Kendra. Your semi-friendly, often cranky, neighborhood wino.

Instagram Photo

I like drinking wine, hanging with my dog, the internet, and complaining about stuff.

Which is great for me, because yesterday marked the first of a new weekly video series on Facebook.

don't judge me i'll get a better photo soon
don’t judge me i’ll get a better photo soon

Wine Night Wednesday is a place for people to come, hangout, drink some wine, and talk about what’s making them need a drink that week.

On this week’s WNW, why were we drinking?

Because getting older is the fucking worst.

It means growing apart from people, it means getting tired earlier, it means your tolerance goes to shit. It’s just hard.

Check out the video here!

This is a new project so please, feel free to leave questions, comments, suggestions, and concerns over my drinking in the comments. Or shoot me an email about anything you’d like to see!

Can’t wait to get drunk with you! Seriously. TC mark

This Is The Aftermath Of ‘Almost Relationships’ (From A Guy’s Perspective)

Posted: 15 Sep 2016 03:00 PM PDT

Allef Vinicius
Allef Vinicius

The worst thing about an almost relationship is the potential that could have been but never was. It leaves you aching for month's even years after things have ended. It leaves you yearning, unjustifiably, for a future that will never exist with the other person. The aftermath of an almost relationship and the way you deal with it, can really have the power to shape who you are and how you view things.

The aftermath of my "almost relationship" left me psychologically addicted to another human being. For about 2 years after things originally ended, I spent a lot of time orchestrating these incredible false realities in my head. I knew that she was so beyond over me. I knew that she was never coming back. I knew that at some point her heart will be taken by someone else. So to mitigate those realities, I very carefully, would imagine myself in these magical dream like scenarios with her. What a terrible idea that was.

The thoughts varied. I would spend so much time thinking about being with her that I actually began to believe that this was something that could actually be achieved.

I need you to believe me when I tell you that I was totally convinced that she and I could make it if we really tried. I need you to believe me when I tell you that I was absolutely convinced that she was the one that I could spend my Friday nights with. I genuinely believed those things, and those beliefs shaped my actions.

Everything I did, I did it for her or with her in mind. For about 2 years I was constantly seeking the approval of another person who didn't even give me the light of day. I spent less time with my parents and more time in my room. More time being quiet, and less time living my life and meeting new people. I was completely and totally incapable of making any attempts to lay my lips on another girl.

I was so unbelievably set on something so simple and innocent: Her and I, together. I lost valuable friends because of my pursuit for a future with a girl who replied to my snapchats with pictures of trashcans on the street corner. Those friendships cannot be saved, and the damage I've done is irreparable.

But fortunately time heals all things and I am better now.

If you ask me how I've been, I would tell you that I am doing fine because I actually am. I would tell you about how little of my thoughts are possessed by her. It's not this constant weight that was bearing on my shoulders at all hours of the day. I can sleep less and not feel as tired, and I am more able to live in the present moment.

If you ask me how I've been, I would tell you about my new passions and what I've been doing to keep busy. I would tell you about my interest in government and politics and how I'm interning with a member of the United States Congress this fall. I would tell you about the kids that I teach and the smiles on their faces when they learn something new.

Almost relationships teach you a lot about yourself. They bring out a side of you that you thought never existed. They put you on the edge of sanity and insanity. It's a wild roller coaster ride. A ride that everyone should try just one time, and never try again. TC mark

50 Heartfelt Texts To Send Your Significant Other (That Aren’t ‘I Love You’)

Posted: 15 Sep 2016 02:00 PM PDT

adamkuylenstierna
adamkuylenstierna

1.

My favorite part of the day is seeing you.

2.

I’m so into you.

3.

You never have to go through it alone, you've got me.

4.

I miss you.

5.

I'm bringing home pizza.

6.

I don't want to do it without you.

7.

I'll be there.

8.

I wouldn't miss it for the world.

9.

You'll always be enough.

11.

Don't worry I'll take care of it.

11.

I'm so happy you're mine.

12.

We can forget about it.

13.

I forgive you.

14.

What you have to say is important to me.

15.

I need you.

16.

I don't know how to do this without you.

17.

I believe in you, even if you don’t believe in yourself.

18.

You bring out the best in me.

19.

I can't imagine my life without you.

20.

I don't know what I did to deserve you.

21.

You deserve it.

22.

You're the best thing that ever happened to me.

23.

I am a better person because of you.

24.

You always make me laugh.

25.

I hope you have the best day.

26.

I'm excited about us.

27.

Nothing matters as much as your happiness.

28.

I love how you look in the morning.

29.

You always make me feel better.

30.

I can't stop thinking about you.

31.

Your laugh makes me smile.

32.

I like you.

33.

I can't wait to wrap my arms around you.

34.

I wish you were here.

35.

I can't wait to kiss you.

36.

I feel so safe around you.

37.

You're perfect for me.

38.

You are so good to me.

39.

I appreciate you.

40.

You never fail to amaze me.

41.

I'd be hopelessly lost without you.

42.

Thank you for being you.

43.

I'll always choose you.

44.

You make forever feel too short.

45.

I can't get you off of my mind.

46.

I adore you.

47.

I'm proud to call you mine.

48.

I want you.

49.

I'm so attracted to you.

50.

There's no where I'd rather be than in your arms again.